Tag Archives: Strategist

Lite n’ Easy open letter

An open letter to the powers that be at Lite n’ Easy, including the Founder, Graham Mitchell.

Let me start by saying: you have a phenomenal product. I use it every single day. So,
this letter is very well intended – I just think you could do a whole lot better as a brand, and we’d love to help.

I’ll start with brand positioning… You have a double headed proposition in your name to explore, but you never really get far beyond the ‘Lite’ part. I suspect people largely view you as a dieting resource due to the messaging you promote – as did I, at first. And this emphasis on losing weight limits your audience and the untold potential in the ‘Easy’ part of your brand offer. God knows, if there’s one thing my husband doesn’t need to do, it’s lose weight. He has that infinite ability to eat whatever he likes, whenever he likes, without expanding like the rest of us. But he’s a fan of yours. And he’s been brazenly spotted sporting your branded packaging on work sites to the surprise of many a fellow tradie. It’s easy, convenient and, in his words: “saves us a shit load of time and effort. You’d be mad to cook.”

Next up, brand image… You look a bit 80s, naff and dated – the ‘n’ in your name certainly doesn’t help – and things are a little over-branded (gasp!) when it comes to food packaging that you can use again. I’m not yet ready to whop out one of your containers on the kitchen bench in my creative community workspace, that’s for sure. And while a lot of people don’t care about this stuff, a whole lot of other people like me, definitely do.

Then there’s the issue of customisation… This really shouldn’t even be a thing we need to talk about in this day and age, yet despite being a ‘full fat’ customer (no pun intended) I can’t tailor my plan to exclude nuts (a major allergy) and I dislike both red apples and any form of stewed fruit in pots – all three of which seem to be a staple of your weekly menus. So, when I get my new weekly order, this is the amount of food I’m likely to waste, which is somewhat unrewarding from both a value for money and an environment perspective. I’m also then left to my own devices to source and swop in extra, alternative snacks, which defeats the point of the control and willpower I’m buying from you.

Screen Shot 2018-08-06 at 10.10.40 am.png

Don’t get me started on how some of your amazing sauces/dressings come in a pot with the world’s smallest pull tab, which is the complete antithesis of ‘Easy’. And don’t let me distract the focus of this piece by calling out:

  • your obsession with one vegetable – the (most humble strain money can buy) tomato;
  • the salads that don’t always last until Monday (the recommended best before day);
  • the practicalities of eating a full orange in the working day;
  • or, the fact that you really should flag up from the word ‘go’ that to be a customer, you need: a) access to a microwave at every mealtime; and b) to make loads of space in your freezer.

None of that last part matters right now, as your food is really tasty – and I wonder why that crucial fact is getting lost in translation? Your powers of organisation are super impressive with the daily packed breakie/lunch/dinner bags that I grab each day. You’re a proud supporter of Australian produce. And you’ve never let me down, not once, despite how up to the wire of the ordering deadline I go.

The bottom line is: we’d love to help you take your brand further. Much further. And as a loyalist customer, I’m perfectly poised to help you, and my team, do this.

Let’s talk,

Michelle Traylor, Director

MamaTray

www.mamatray.com

P.s. I’d have addressed this letter directly to the power/s that be if I could find out who she/he/they are but an internet trawl, some LinkedIn browsing, plus an online chat with customer service, all left me fully in the dark. Another example which flies in the face of ‘Easy’ and reveals that the brand isn’t fully up to date with the transparent times we live in.

The Importance of Being Earnest

unnamed

Let’s do a little exercise…

Swap your LinkedIn profile pic for your Facebook profile pic for a day – or maybe even a week – and see what happens. My bet is you’ll get question-marks, a lotta likes, heaps of giggle emojis and a few job offers from places you didn’t think existed! If you’re anything like me, the two are pretty different.

That’s the backside of my first born when he was 8 months (he’s 6 now but not much has changed!) on my Facebook profile pic (I’ve two more little bottoms to add to that now!) – can’t see that bringing in too many job offers on LI!

The thing is though, it says more about me than my actual LinkedIn pic. Only a touch more mind you, because my LinkedIn profile pic is a bit of a giggle too – two haircuts for the price of one! Anyway… Try this experiment with all your mates!

Have a look at their LinkedIn profile pics and then their Facebook ones. Which is closer to
the person you know and love? I’m guessing the Facebook one. So why do we put on our
Sunday best Maclean smiles and good angles for LinkedIn and save the bedheads and craycray’s for Facey?

What version of ourselves are we presenting to future employers? The version we have
the energy to maintain around the office 1, 3 or 5 years into the future? That’s a lot of
whitening toothpaste!!

Instead, why not find a happy medium? Ask yourself – does the person in that pic look like it could be me from 5 – 9, not just ‘9 to 5’? If yes, upload! Now, I don’t mean legs over head,
Bacardi Breezer all over dress, blowing a vuvuzela at a hen’s do, but someone you can deliver easily, comfortably and honestly everyday – that doesn’t require you to have ‘work clothes’ and ‘rest-of-life clothes’!

If you’re having trouble deciding on the perfect shot, you’ve got a ready made panel of judges in your mates!

These wise words come from the brain of Mandy Lawler.

Humming to The Same Tune

I needed to quit my job.

I decided that it was an essential part of my personal and professional development. Even though I loved the people I worked with, I slowly started to become more and more aware of things that just weren’t working and NEEDED to change, to account for this new agile business era that we’ve moved into. Things, that those much loved people I worked with, just didn’t want to, or know how to, change. (Even with my persistence.) Unfortunately, resistance to change is the ultimate creativity and innovation killer.

So, I started searching for more, and I found MamaTray. Or maybe, MamaTray found me. Either way – the transition has been more eye-opening than I could have expected.
These are my (10) starters for 10 (a phrase I’ve learnt from working here) –

  • Choosing music is a collaborative process. Everyone has a say. And if they don’t, they should! This sets the atmosphere for the day’s work.
  • Colour, colour, colour!!! It helps stimulate creativity, boost your mood, and keep everyday, monotonous things interesting.
  • Don’t blame it on the stationery. You CAN have fun, sparkly, multi-coloured, jarring patterned stationery and still be professional. Remember Legally Blonde?.. Haters gonna hate.
  • Regular check-ins. Managers neeed to, I repeat, neeeeeed to check in with their employees As. Much. As. Possible. Without being micro managers and without holding up efficiency. Having regular chats mean that things stay on track, everyone feels heard and problems can be nipped in the bud.
  • Team hang-outs are a must. We work together more hours than not, so we should really be trying to bond. Create, for yourself, a work family.
  • Gift a puppy. (By puppy, I mean, an awesome project.) Let someone take care of it, nurture it, and see it to fruition. There’s no better compliment than that.
  • A little chin-wag never hurt no body. We’re all human here, and we love to tell stories. (Stay tuned…)
  • Be nice to yourself. Eat that cupcake if you need to. Take a breather if you need to. Play with Freddie if you need to. (MT’s super cute, Wirehaired German Pointer.) In the long term, it’ll make a huge difference.
  • Say hello to change! Yes, and welcome it with open arms. This is what will keep you and the business afloat.
  • Finally, show us how it’s done. This is probably the most important of all. Don’t give resentment any room to grow, and lead by example. Positivity breeds positivity, and the same can be said for hard work.

img_5167

Here at MamaTray, we know what great internal culture looks like. And, we want to share this with our clients and everyone we know. If all your employees can ‘hum along to the same tune’ (even if in different harmonies) – you’re doing it right. Your brand and your business will reap many rewards.

Happy humming!

These wise words come from the brain of Angie Caro, Junior Strategist at MamaTray.