Tag Archives: motivation

Finding your ‘why’

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How sustainable is the ‘Do what you love’ mantra?

Miya Tokumitsu, author of ‘Do What You Love And Other Lies About Success and Happiness’, says, in an interview with The Altantic, she feels there’s a sort of dark hedonism in the pursuit of this ideal – like an addiction, where one is relentlessly seeking those “good feelings.”

Is this another way of saying that the ‘too much of a good thing’ principle can apply to a career based only on ‘love’?

Case in point – I worked in a café for 6 months surrounded by delicious food (my ‘happy place’) and ended up 10kgs heavier and very unfulfilled!

So, I think better advice is to find what ‘we care about’.

We are constantly telling organisations to find and commit to their ‘why’ and communicate this through a meaningful brand, but we don’t necessarily put the same pressures on ourselves.

I think a lot of the reason is that it’s easier said than done for most of us.

There’s mortgages to pay, bills to deal with, kids to raise, cars to fix – wistfully pursuing a noble vocation that usually translates to little $$ might be a bit pie-in-the-sky.

So how on earth do those of us stuck in a ‘what’ get some ‘why’ in our lives? How do we fish out the ‘vocation’ in our ‘profession’?

We might find some answers in the endless advice on ‘careers’ and ‘callings’ littered through
the internet.

Here’s two phrases I came across, for instance, that resonate with me…

‘Consider your epitaph, not your resume’

What do you really want to be remembered for? Read out your eulogy in your head – are you happy with what’s being said? What change can you make in your next career move that carves out more of your epitaph and less of your resume?

‘Find a problem to solve‘

How can I make my professional skill work to help fix a societal problem? Is there something I can do after hours, something I could suggest as an extra-curricular activity at work that makes a difference in a way I know will be fulfilling?

It’s not easy, but getting little bit of ‘why’ in our everyday work lives might go a long way.

Incidentally, I’ve now found my ‘why’ here at MamaTray where I now eat a lot less sandwiches and use my strategy smarts to help other organisations find their ‘why’. Ha!

These wise words come from the brain of Mandy Lawler.

If Office Fridges Could Talk

I didn’t mean for this entry to be self-congratulatory. Truly i didn’t. But it’s turning out that way.

Our office fridge is doing pretty well if you ask me. I give it a 7/10.

There’s no ye olde science-experiment, abandoned lunches from 1992. We’ve kept the colours, preservatives, stabilisers, emulsifiers and other wordy additives to a very dull roar.

We’ve got a small selection of fresh veggies and fruit and the sweetest our drinks get is coconut water (whoops almost missed that cheeky San Pellegrino – well everyone needs to party now and then).

We’ve managed a decent nod to both new age proteins – not one but two brands of hommus! – and ‘old skool’ – ham and swiss cheese slices (and none of that plastic cheese either thanks very much!).

The pickled onions are a nice touch too – what we don’t snack on, we can cocktail-party with!

Go us!

But…

There’s not much in the way of packed lunches, which means we might be eating out a wee bit too much – what are our mums doing!??

And the freeze-over of the freezer needs to be addressed for two reasons – chewing up energy since the fridge is less efficient and, more importantly, putting to bed the chance of a cheeky Ben and Jerry’s “The Late Dough” if we ever get tempted.

There’s also a weird safe-house for abused soy satchels developing in the veggie crisper which should probably be a bit fuller with veggies.

But on balance – great work ladies!

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In all seriousness though, we intuitively know that eating well matters – but eating well at work is super-dooper important.

An HBR article* on the subject tells us that eating up to 7 portions of fruits and vegetables a day makes us more engaged, happier and more creative at work since they contain vital nutrients that stimulate the production of dopamine, a neurotransmitter that plays a key role in the experience of curiosity, motivation and engagement – all the vital elements in a buzzy workplace culture.

Send us your fridge pics for an interrogation – you might be surprised!

Happy chewing!

*https://hbr.org/2014/10/what-you-eat-affects-your-productivity

These wise words come from the brain of Mandy Lawler