Tag Archives: Culture

Worketypes

Archetypes – I just can’t say the word without wincing!

It was all the rage a while ago to apply in brand strategising and I was stabbing myself in the eye with what seemed like its mindless simplification.

But, for all my suspicions it was a useful-ish tool and often provided a good base to create nuance from.

In case you need a recap, there’s twelve of them – the Outlaw, Jester, Lover, Caregiver, Everyman, Innocent, Ruler, Sage, Magician, Hero, Creator, Explorer.*

Then these twelve get neatly shuffled into four orientation groups which describe their common basic motivation – social, order, freedom, ego.

The origin of the thinking is from Carl Jung – which means, of course, there must be some substance to it since Jung was clearly no fly-by-nighter.

“Carl Jung popularized the concept of archetype in his book, The Structure of the Psyche. He describes archetypes as being universal models of people, ways of being/acting (personality). He believed that these archetypes inhabit our dreams and, what he called, the collective unconscious.

Archetypes constitute the structure of the collective unconscious – they are psychic innate dispositions to experience and represent basic human behavior and situations. Thus mother-child relationship is governed by the mother archetype. Father-child – by the father archetype.” Carl-Jung.net**

Lately, I’ve been thinking about them again.

I think I was suspicious about the system originally because I hadn’t subjected it to the real-life test.

Could I see this in myself, in the people around me every day, in the people I meet randomly? Does it highlight obvious and consistent patterns in my friend-making, boss-following, colleague-gravitating and partner-picking?

Let’s see.

I reckon I’m a ‘creator’. I reckon my boss is a ‘hero’ (yes, I know that sounds sucky!) and I think my dear work mate is a ‘magician’.

Ta-da! We’re all from the ego side – something definitely going on there.

My husband’s definitely a ‘creator’ too, so that makes a boring amount of sense – I like ‘what-if-ers’ and he does too.

Worketype1.jpgBut maybe a real test of the system’s worth would be its pre-rationalisation vs post-rationalisation prowess?

Could it predict the type of people who will fit together?

Could it help us, for instance, work out how to create the best teams at work?

J. Richard Hackman, the Edgar Pierce Professor of Social and Organizational Psychology at Harvard University and a leading expert on teams (Hackman has spent a career exploring, and questioning, the wisdom of teams), in an HBR article interviewing him about his book “Leading teams”, says: “Every team needs a deviant, someone who can help the team by challenging the tendency to want too much homogeneity, which can stifle creativity and learning. Deviants are the ones who stand back and say, “Well, wait a minute, why are we even doing this at all? What if we looked at the thing backwards or turned it inside out?” That’s when people say, “Oh, no, no, no, that’s ridiculous,” and so the discussion about what’s ridiculous comes up.”***

Is that another way of saying every team needs a ‘rebel’ in it?

Are there other archetypes a good team needs? Should we be looking to mix and match archetypes when we’re creating dream-teams instead of (or as well as) just mixing and matching skills, experience, age and all those other demographics? Should we be throwing together people from the same orientation side – all ‘ego’s’ or all ‘order’s’ or a mix?

Apply this in your own day.

What archetype are you (honestly!!)? What are the archetypes of the people around you at work, at home, socially? Are there patterns to who you gel with? Who you listen to? Who you can’t stand? Who you produce your best work with? Who you crush on?

Is there some worth in doing something with those patterns to make better choices?

We’d love to know – go all out in the comments!

 

 

*http://www.soulcraft.co/essays/the_12_common_archetypes.html
**https://www.huffingtonpost.com/shakti-sutriasa-lcsw-ma/why-ancient-archetypes-ma_b_10023876.html

***https://hbr.org/2009/05/why-teams-dont-work

 
These wise words come from the brain of Mandy Lawler.

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Humming to The Same Tune

I needed to quit my job.

I decided that it was an essential part of my personal and professional development. Even though I loved the people I worked with, I slowly started to become more and more aware of things that just weren’t working and NEEDED to change, to account for this new agile business era that we’ve moved into. Things, that those much loved people I worked with, just didn’t want to, or know how to, change. (Even with my persistence.) Unfortunately, resistance to change is the ultimate creativity and innovation killer.

So, I started searching for more, and I found MamaTray. Or maybe, MamaTray found me. Either way – the transition has been more eye-opening than I could have expected.
These are my (10) starters for 10 (a phrase I’ve learnt from working here) –

  • Choosing music is a collaborative process. Everyone has a say. And if they don’t, they should! This sets the atmosphere for the day’s work.
  • Colour, colour, colour!!! It helps stimulate creativity, boost your mood, and keep everyday, monotonous things interesting.
  • Don’t blame it on the stationery. You CAN have fun, sparkly, multi-coloured, jarring patterned stationery and still be professional. Remember Legally Blonde?.. Haters gonna hate.
  • Regular check-ins. Managers neeed to, I repeat, neeeeeed to check in with their employees As. Much. As. Possible. Without being micro managers and without holding up efficiency. Having regular chats mean that things stay on track, everyone feels heard and problems can be nipped in the bud.
  • Team hang-outs are a must. We work together more hours than not, so we should really be trying to bond. Create, for yourself, a work family.
  • Gift a puppy. (By puppy, I mean, an awesome project.) Let someone take care of it, nurture it, and see it to fruition. There’s no better compliment than that.
  • A little chin-wag never hurt no body. We’re all human here, and we love to tell stories. (Stay tuned…)
  • Be nice to yourself. Eat that cupcake if you need to. Take a breather if you need to. Play with Freddie if you need to. (MT’s super cute, Wirehaired German Pointer.) In the long term, it’ll make a huge difference.
  • Say hello to change! Yes, and welcome it with open arms. This is what will keep you and the business afloat.
  • Finally, show us how it’s done. This is probably the most important of all. Don’t give resentment any room to grow, and lead by example. Positivity breeds positivity, and the same can be said for hard work.

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Here at MamaTray, we know what great internal culture looks like. And, we want to share this with our clients and everyone we know. If all your employees can ‘hum along to the same tune’ (even if in different harmonies) – you’re doing it right. Your brand and your business will reap many rewards.

Happy humming!

These wise words come from the brain of Angie Caro, Junior Strategist at MamaTray.

If Office Fridges Could Talk

I didn’t mean for this entry to be self-congratulatory. Truly i didn’t. But it’s turning out that way.

Our office fridge is doing pretty well if you ask me. I give it a 7/10.

There’s no ye olde science-experiment, abandoned lunches from 1992. We’ve kept the colours, preservatives, stabilisers, emulsifiers and other wordy additives to a very dull roar.

We’ve got a small selection of fresh veggies and fruit and the sweetest our drinks get is coconut water (whoops almost missed that cheeky San Pellegrino – well everyone needs to party now and then).

We’ve managed a decent nod to both new age proteins – not one but two brands of hommus! – and ‘old skool’ – ham and swiss cheese slices (and none of that plastic cheese either thanks very much!).

The pickled onions are a nice touch too – what we don’t snack on, we can cocktail-party with!

Go us!

But…

There’s not much in the way of packed lunches, which means we might be eating out a wee bit too much – what are our mums doing!??

And the freeze-over of the freezer needs to be addressed for two reasons – chewing up energy since the fridge is less efficient and, more importantly, putting to bed the chance of a cheeky Ben and Jerry’s “The Late Dough” if we ever get tempted.

There’s also a weird safe-house for abused soy satchels developing in the veggie crisper which should probably be a bit fuller with veggies.

But on balance – great work ladies!

annotated_fridge

In all seriousness though, we intuitively know that eating well matters – but eating well at work is super-dooper important.

An HBR article* on the subject tells us that eating up to 7 portions of fruits and vegetables a day makes us more engaged, happier and more creative at work since they contain vital nutrients that stimulate the production of dopamine, a neurotransmitter that plays a key role in the experience of curiosity, motivation and engagement – all the vital elements in a buzzy workplace culture.

Send us your fridge pics for an interrogation – you might be surprised!

Happy chewing!

*https://hbr.org/2014/10/what-you-eat-affects-your-productivity

These wise words come from the brain of Mandy Lawler