Tag Archives: brand

Grrr… Michelle is a bit rattled!

I’ve had some really crappy customer service recently. And it’s got me a bit rattled, so I thought I’d put fingers to keyboard, and vent a little.

“Choose Express Post and your T-shirts will be with you in time for the Hottest 100!” Well I did, and yet they weren’t… They arrived on the Tuesday after the Sunday countdown and are now sitting in a redundant heap on the kitchen table. $12.95 doesn’t sound much, but it’s the principle. Two emails of complaint to customer service later and I’m nowhere near getting even a decent apology, let alone my money back. It’s always someone else’s fault, isn’t it? Or, better still, there’s the age-old caveat of “during periods of unprecedented demand”… But how was this unprecedented? These T-shirts were specifically designed for the most infamous event in the Triple J calendar AND, get this, they were on sale to raise money for Lifeline. Ipso facto, they were meant to zooooom off the shelves!

Then there’s the coffee machine I bought my husband before Christmas. He has one of those December birthdays which is tricky – do you go large for the birthday, or save it for a couple of weeks? I went early in this case. But the honeymoon of that “we now have our own coffee machine, look how much money we’re saving” feeling was shattered a few weeks after Christmas when it started leaking water out of the bottom like a sieve. First, the (reputable) café owners didn’t believe me and tried it themselves to check there was actually an issue. Erm, thanks for the vote of confidence. Then they sent it off to the manufacturers to be fixed, leaving me with no apology, and no way of making coffee in the meantime. The vortex that is the ‘service centre’ means no one could tell me when our machine would be back in my possession. And the little information I did glean was through me making all the effort – visiting the café, plus calling up for an update. When it did return, a couple of weeks later (a couple of weeks!!), it was all smiles from the café dude, free coffee beans, and an escorted product placed back in my car.* He was lovely and a far cry from the sheepish, somewhat sullen, confrontation-avoiding man I dealt with at the time of crisis.

Finally, for a Throwback Thursday experience which has never left me, there is the introduction of the (somewhat annoying) host at the front of your classic retail store whose role is to essentially trap you en route to where you want to go. Seemingly friendly, but often very far from interested in allowing you through. In this particular store, I wanted to buy what a retailer would refer to as ‘an accessory’ rather than a large ticket item. They live at the back of the store, far from where I was accosted. So, I was eventually deemed not worthy enough to be restrained any longer, and allowed to free roam. I wasn’t impressed with the selection, and I had questions to clarify. Looking round, no one was free – I was in the area where the hard-core contracts were being signed, and everyone was head down with their respective customers. I therefore left, went across the road to a competitor and spent triple the amount of money I intended to thanks to some real ‘fluffing’ and metaphorical ‘stroking’. They elevated my mere accessory to a real ‘must have’ and I left the store with two of them, a real pep in my step, and quite the unnoticeable dent in my wallet.

Some observations on the above:

  • No brand is beyond the need to care and serve
  • The customer should always be given the benefit of the doubt
  • Employees need to be equipped to have tough conversations
  • Don’t let bad will build and fester – keep customers in the loop
  • ‘Service’ shouldn’t ever be about getting rid of people/putting them off/moving on to the next person**
  • Never judge a customer’s spending power by the size of their wishlist – the big ticket item lurks in all of us

They say that an unhappy customer tells 9-15 people about their bad experience – think I’ve just done a little more than that – and it takes 12 good experiences to make up for one bad one.*** So, time for a name and shame? It’s 24Hundred, the T-shirt provider; Coffee Brothers in Mona Vale; and good old Telstra, who lost out to Apple!

Michelle is always open to having a discussion about your brand, your customers, and your employees, and overcoming pitfalls. She promises not to talk about herself in the third person again, unless absolutely necessary.

* In his enthusiasm to close my boot, and get me the hell outta there, he forced his grip against the electric closing feature. And now, on occasion, it doesn’t close properly… 😩

** Centrelink and Medicare, take note!

*** Stats courtesy of: https://reputationrefinery.com/96-of-unhappy-customers-wont-complain-to-you-but-will-tell-15-friends-infographic

Lite n’ Easy open letter

An open letter to the powers that be at Lite n’ Easy, including the Founder, Graham Mitchell.

Let me start by saying: you have a phenomenal product. I use it every single day. So,
this letter is very well intended – I just think you could do a whole lot better as a brand, and we’d love to help.

I’ll start with brand positioning… You have a double headed proposition in your name to explore, but you never really get far beyond the ‘Lite’ part. I suspect people largely view you as a dieting resource due to the messaging you promote – as did I, at first. And this emphasis on losing weight limits your audience and the untold potential in the ‘Easy’ part of your brand offer. God knows, if there’s one thing my husband doesn’t need to do, it’s lose weight. He has that infinite ability to eat whatever he likes, whenever he likes, without expanding like the rest of us. But he’s a fan of yours. And he’s been brazenly spotted sporting your branded packaging on work sites to the surprise of many a fellow tradie. It’s easy, convenient and, in his words: “saves us a shit load of time and effort. You’d be mad to cook.”

Next up, brand image… You look a bit 80s, naff and dated – the ‘n’ in your name certainly doesn’t help – and things are a little over-branded (gasp!) when it comes to food packaging that you can use again. I’m not yet ready to whop out one of your containers on the kitchen bench in my creative community workspace, that’s for sure. And while a lot of people don’t care about this stuff, a whole lot of other people like me, definitely do.

Then there’s the issue of customisation… This really shouldn’t even be a thing we need to talk about in this day and age, yet despite being a ‘full fat’ customer (no pun intended) I can’t tailor my plan to exclude nuts (a major allergy) and I dislike both red apples and any form of stewed fruit in pots – all three of which seem to be a staple of your weekly menus. So, when I get my new weekly order, this is the amount of food I’m likely to waste, which is somewhat unrewarding from both a value for money and an environment perspective. I’m also then left to my own devices to source and swop in extra, alternative snacks, which defeats the point of the control and willpower I’m buying from you.

Screen Shot 2018-08-06 at 10.10.40 am.png

Don’t get me started on how some of your amazing sauces/dressings come in a pot with the world’s smallest pull tab, which is the complete antithesis of ‘Easy’. And don’t let me distract the focus of this piece by calling out:

  • your obsession with one vegetable – the (most humble strain money can buy) tomato;
  • the salads that don’t always last until Monday (the recommended best before day);
  • the practicalities of eating a full orange in the working day;
  • or, the fact that you really should flag up from the word ‘go’ that to be a customer, you need: a) access to a microwave at every mealtime; and b) to make loads of space in your freezer.

None of that last part matters right now, as your food is really tasty – and I wonder why that crucial fact is getting lost in translation? Your powers of organisation are super impressive with the daily packed breakie/lunch/dinner bags that I grab each day. You’re a proud supporter of Australian produce. And you’ve never let me down, not once, despite how up to the wire of the ordering deadline I go.

The bottom line is: we’d love to help you take your brand further. Much further. And as a loyalist customer, I’m perfectly poised to help you, and my team, do this.

Let’s talk,

Michelle Traylor, Director

MamaTray

www.mamatray.com

P.s. I’d have addressed this letter directly to the power/s that be if I could find out who she/he/they are but an internet trawl, some LinkedIn browsing, plus an online chat with customer service, all left me fully in the dark. Another example which flies in the face of ‘Easy’ and reveals that the brand isn’t fully up to date with the transparent times we live in.

Like a founder

Screen Shot 2018-08-02 at 9.19.37 am

How’s about this royal commission, ay?

It’s hard to watch.

Big, robust, established brands taking a bashing every which way, and rightly so. There’s nowhere to hide!

I was talking to a friend who works at AMP and she rolled her eyes showing me an article about the sordid details of dodgy director activity; saying Thomas Mort (who co-founded Australian Mutual Provident – AMP) must be rolling in his grave!

I got wondering…

Would the ghost of Mr Mort really be wailing and gnashing his teeth somewhere – completely deflated at what his baby had become?

What did he want AMP to be when it was a wee fledging?

So I interneted…

And I scored!

From the Argus (a popular old Melbourne newspaper) of 1877 Feb 9th,  a reporter wrote this of the ambition of the infant institution:

“Moved by such spectacles of bereavement and destitution, and doubtless observing that comparatively few had availed themselves of life assurance, our founders combined together to establish a society not for money-making, but for mutual aid, and to induce all within the sphere of their influence to unite in the good cause.”*

!!!!

And again, quoting the Founders…

“It is hoped the directors and superior officers will never be found wanting in vigilance, sagacity and probity in administering their sacred trust; but I have often tried to impress upon the members, and I take this public opportunity of reiterating that a heavy responsibility rests upon them also. It lies with them to fill up vacancies on the board and they should see to it that their votes are never given on any ground of mere personal friendship or antipathy, or because of the importunities of candidates. Always seek out and support trustworthy men who have the best interests of the society at heart and who have shown the ripe fruits of prudence, knowledge and experience in other walks of life.”*

!!!!!!

Eeeeppp – yes, I think there might be some Earth moving going on!

It makes you wonder how many other creaky old founders would be rolling in their graves at times like this, despairing of the nobility of the institutions they had bled to breathe life into…

Why does this happen?

Is it the inevitable side-effect of corporate growth?

When an organisation starts becoming successful and piles on the employees, does the essence of the Founder get further and further away from the heart of the business? (Not to mention once the Founder passes on!)

Is it realistic to expect hundreds, thousands and sometimes tens of thousands of employees to demonstrate the same intensity, altruism, guts, passion, conviction and single-mindedness the Founder may have had?

We worry about this at MamaTray and have developed ‘Like A Founder’ – a program to rediscover and infuse the Founder’s energy, ambitions and character back into an organisation.

Our ultimate aim is to make sure graves, and more importantly, legacies are still respected, optimised and celebrated.

If you’d like us to help your organisation get in touch with its inner Founder, just drop us an email at help@mamatray.com.

No rollin’!

*https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/5914425
Image: https://dictionaryofsydney.org/person/mort_thomas_sutcliffe


These wise words come from the brain of Mandy Lawler.

Worketypes

Archetypes – I just can’t say the word without wincing!

It was all the rage a while ago to apply in brand strategising and I was stabbing myself in the eye with what seemed like its mindless simplification.

But, for all my suspicions it was a useful-ish tool and often provided a good base to create nuance from.

In case you need a recap, there’s twelve of them – the Outlaw, Jester, Lover, Caregiver, Everyman, Innocent, Ruler, Sage, Magician, Hero, Creator, Explorer.*

Then these twelve get neatly shuffled into four orientation groups which describe their common basic motivation – social, order, freedom, ego.

The origin of the thinking is from Carl Jung – which means, of course, there must be some substance to it since Jung was clearly no fly-by-nighter.

“Carl Jung popularized the concept of archetype in his book, The Structure of the Psyche. He describes archetypes as being universal models of people, ways of being/acting (personality). He believed that these archetypes inhabit our dreams and, what he called, the collective unconscious.

Archetypes constitute the structure of the collective unconscious – they are psychic innate dispositions to experience and represent basic human behavior and situations. Thus mother-child relationship is governed by the mother archetype. Father-child – by the father archetype.” Carl-Jung.net**

Lately, I’ve been thinking about them again.

I think I was suspicious about the system originally because I hadn’t subjected it to the real-life test.

Could I see this in myself, in the people around me every day, in the people I meet randomly? Does it highlight obvious and consistent patterns in my friend-making, boss-following, colleague-gravitating and partner-picking?

Let’s see.

I reckon I’m a ‘creator’. I reckon my boss is a ‘hero’ (yes, I know that sounds sucky!) and I think my dear work mate is a ‘magician’.

Ta-da! We’re all from the ego side – something definitely going on there.

My husband’s definitely a ‘creator’ too, so that makes a boring amount of sense – I like ‘what-if-ers’ and he does too.

Worketype1.jpgBut maybe a real test of the system’s worth would be its pre-rationalisation vs post-rationalisation prowess?

Could it predict the type of people who will fit together?

Could it help us, for instance, work out how to create the best teams at work?

J. Richard Hackman, the Edgar Pierce Professor of Social and Organizational Psychology at Harvard University and a leading expert on teams (Hackman has spent a career exploring, and questioning, the wisdom of teams), in an HBR article interviewing him about his book “Leading teams”, says: “Every team needs a deviant, someone who can help the team by challenging the tendency to want too much homogeneity, which can stifle creativity and learning. Deviants are the ones who stand back and say, “Well, wait a minute, why are we even doing this at all? What if we looked at the thing backwards or turned it inside out?” That’s when people say, “Oh, no, no, no, that’s ridiculous,” and so the discussion about what’s ridiculous comes up.”***

Is that another way of saying every team needs a ‘rebel’ in it?

Are there other archetypes a good team needs? Should we be looking to mix and match archetypes when we’re creating dream-teams instead of (or as well as) just mixing and matching skills, experience, age and all those other demographics? Should we be throwing together people from the same orientation side – all ‘ego’s’ or all ‘order’s’ or a mix?

Apply this in your own day.

What archetype are you (honestly!!)? What are the archetypes of the people around you at work, at home, socially? Are there patterns to who you gel with? Who you listen to? Who you can’t stand? Who you produce your best work with? Who you crush on?

Is there some worth in doing something with those patterns to make better choices?

We’d love to know – go all out in the comments!

 

 

*http://www.soulcraft.co/essays/the_12_common_archetypes.html
**https://www.huffingtonpost.com/shakti-sutriasa-lcsw-ma/why-ancient-archetypes-ma_b_10023876.html

***https://hbr.org/2009/05/why-teams-dont-work

 
These wise words come from the brain of Mandy Lawler.

Humming to The Same Tune

I needed to quit my job.

I decided that it was an essential part of my personal and professional development. Even though I loved the people I worked with, I slowly started to become more and more aware of things that just weren’t working and NEEDED to change, to account for this new agile business era that we’ve moved into. Things, that those much loved people I worked with, just didn’t want to, or know how to, change. (Even with my persistence.) Unfortunately, resistance to change is the ultimate creativity and innovation killer.

So, I started searching for more, and I found MamaTray. Or maybe, MamaTray found me. Either way – the transition has been more eye-opening than I could have expected.
These are my (10) starters for 10 (a phrase I’ve learnt from working here) –

  • Choosing music is a collaborative process. Everyone has a say. And if they don’t, they should! This sets the atmosphere for the day’s work.
  • Colour, colour, colour!!! It helps stimulate creativity, boost your mood, and keep everyday, monotonous things interesting.
  • Don’t blame it on the stationery. You CAN have fun, sparkly, multi-coloured, jarring patterned stationery and still be professional. Remember Legally Blonde?.. Haters gonna hate.
  • Regular check-ins. Managers neeed to, I repeat, neeeeeed to check in with their employees As. Much. As. Possible. Without being micro managers and without holding up efficiency. Having regular chats mean that things stay on track, everyone feels heard and problems can be nipped in the bud.
  • Team hang-outs are a must. We work together more hours than not, so we should really be trying to bond. Create, for yourself, a work family.
  • Gift a puppy. (By puppy, I mean, an awesome project.) Let someone take care of it, nurture it, and see it to fruition. There’s no better compliment than that.
  • A little chin-wag never hurt no body. We’re all human here, and we love to tell stories. (Stay tuned…)
  • Be nice to yourself. Eat that cupcake if you need to. Take a breather if you need to. Play with Freddie if you need to. (MT’s super cute, Wirehaired German Pointer.) In the long term, it’ll make a huge difference.
  • Say hello to change! Yes, and welcome it with open arms. This is what will keep you and the business afloat.
  • Finally, show us how it’s done. This is probably the most important of all. Don’t give resentment any room to grow, and lead by example. Positivity breeds positivity, and the same can be said for hard work.

img_5167

Here at MamaTray, we know what great internal culture looks like. And, we want to share this with our clients and everyone we know. If all your employees can ‘hum along to the same tune’ (even if in different harmonies) – you’re doing it right. Your brand and your business will reap many rewards.

Happy humming!

These wise words come from the brain of Angie Caro, Junior Strategist at MamaTray.

If Office Fridges Could Talk

I didn’t mean for this entry to be self-congratulatory. Truly i didn’t. But it’s turning out that way.

Our office fridge is doing pretty well if you ask me. I give it a 7/10.

There’s no ye olde science-experiment, abandoned lunches from 1992. We’ve kept the colours, preservatives, stabilisers, emulsifiers and other wordy additives to a very dull roar.

We’ve got a small selection of fresh veggies and fruit and the sweetest our drinks get is coconut water (whoops almost missed that cheeky San Pellegrino – well everyone needs to party now and then).

We’ve managed a decent nod to both new age proteins – not one but two brands of hommus! – and ‘old skool’ – ham and swiss cheese slices (and none of that plastic cheese either thanks very much!).

The pickled onions are a nice touch too – what we don’t snack on, we can cocktail-party with!

Go us!

But…

There’s not much in the way of packed lunches, which means we might be eating out a wee bit too much – what are our mums doing!??

And the freeze-over of the freezer needs to be addressed for two reasons – chewing up energy since the fridge is less efficient and, more importantly, putting to bed the chance of a cheeky Ben and Jerry’s “The Late Dough” if we ever get tempted.

There’s also a weird safe-house for abused soy satchels developing in the veggie crisper which should probably be a bit fuller with veggies.

But on balance – great work ladies!

annotated_fridge

In all seriousness though, we intuitively know that eating well matters – but eating well at work is super-dooper important.

An HBR article* on the subject tells us that eating up to 7 portions of fruits and vegetables a day makes us more engaged, happier and more creative at work since they contain vital nutrients that stimulate the production of dopamine, a neurotransmitter that plays a key role in the experience of curiosity, motivation and engagement – all the vital elements in a buzzy workplace culture.

Send us your fridge pics for an interrogation – you might be surprised!

Happy chewing!

*https://hbr.org/2014/10/what-you-eat-affects-your-productivity

These wise words come from the brain of Mandy Lawler

THE FRIDAY RANT (2)

Hello! Today I’m going to talk about loyalty programs, within the context of a good old rant… FullSizeRender

Firstly, just wanna put the thought out there on what is probably my biggest bug bear with the whole notion of loyalty programs: how can loyalty expire? If I’ve been loyal, I’ve made a conscious, positive choice to stick with one brand (and God knows there are plenty to choose from out there) and I’ve bought a number of their products and/or services over a period of time. My eyes may have been turned by a number of other, attractive specimens – I’m only human, after all – but I’ve remained strong, focused and committed, with my eye on the prize. But what is that prize? – A plastic card that glimmers in a slightly more metallic way than the one I had last time. – A transitory sense of reward that’s veiled in a threat of these miles/points/bonuses expiring in a year’s time, or even less. – A promotion that inevitably seems to have ended, by the time I’ve finally had the chance to claim it. – An ever mounting pile of points that I hoard with glee, but I’m never quite sure what exactly I can spend them on.

Collecting points is somewhat addictive – consider how you feel when you’re in a particular retail store and realise your loyalty card is in your other wallet/bag/car (you’re a bit posh!). You’re briefly reassured by the fact that you can ring customer services and reclaim those points at a later date, but do you ever get round to it?? I don’t. It’s on my ever–increasing ‘personal admin’ to-do list but, sadly, that doesn’t mean it gets done. If you look at the origins of the word ‘loyal’, it was borne way back, out of such significant developments as the legal system, with the definition of law abiding citizens, and ye olde feudal system. And I think right here is where we get to the heart of the problem. Loyalty was about being loyal to your sovereign/government/master – I’d love to say mistress as well, but we all know no one is loyal to a mistress. And if you were repeatedly subservient to your master then you were considered loyal, trustworthy and presumably therefore tipped for the top. Well, not the top, but some form of reward, or privilege, versus those wastrels who were not quite as loyal.

So, in our case, does that make the brands we’re loyal to our masters?! Erm, I think not. We’re the ones with the cash; the ones that keep them in business; the people who help deliver them profits (along with their slaves, sorry, employees); and we’re the ones who can make or break their destiny. Hmmm. So, remind me then why they can dash our dreams in an instant by informing us in a bog standard email template that we’ve slipped from the heady heights of Silver to Scum, and make us feel really quite unworthy of their attention, as we dared to not need their services this year, quite as much as we did last year. I can’t possibly fit all my loyalty cards in one wallet, not even an electronic wallet, as the brands in question don’t necessarily all subscribe to the digital age just yet.

I’ve got cards for: supermarkets; department stores; chemists/toiletry providers; hotels; airlines; cafés; homeware/design stores (swoon) and no doubt more besides. But I can count on one hand the tangible, impressive rewards I’ve received for my loyalty. These rewards have all come smack bang out of nowhere and that’s when I think brands get it absolutely right – when they make us feel really special and knock us for six (in a good way, obv). In essence, when they actually deliver on that well versed marketing concept of ‘surprise and delight’.

So, here we go… I’m going to call out the top three brands that have made me feel very special indeed, in order of impressiveness:

1. Emirates Emirates is an absolutely legendary brand. In less than 2 years, I’ve gone from intrigued trialist, to hard core loyalist, and I’m already a Silver member, to boot. (Having family and friends in a wonderful homeland on the other side of the world might just have given me an advantage there.) I was flying back to Sydney from London, via Dubai, with my sister, my ‘sister in law’ (the ‘bling fund’ hasn’t stretched to a proposal just yet) and her boyfriend. And Emirates gave my entire crew a free upgrade to Business, based on my Silver status eligibility for a spontaneous upgrade. The remaining three peeps in my party were all flying Emirates for the very first time, albeit on my recommendation, and only one of them checked in at the same time as me, benefitting from the same surname, and the same Traylor eyelashes to flutter on cue. Half an hour later, we were all reclined, with a champers in hand and absolutely stoked! (In fact, my sister nearly got trapped in the flat bed position, prior to take off, because she was playing with the settings so much. How the usual Business class flyers loved us…) I’ve just booked another long haul flight with Emirates for this year’s holiday and got the man of the house into the club too. And my sister is travelling with them next month for her visit back to our homeland, having switched from her usual Qantas flight partner. So, while the flight was probably empty enough on that London to Dubai leg in question, and it didn’t cost them all that much to reward us, it has paid more than a few dividends for them already. And I haven’t looked back. I’d already been impressed with the quality of the service and product I received, but now I’m totally committed and won’t look elsewhere. A faithful and loyal subject, if you will.

2. Westin It was a pretty awesome milestone for the MamaTray business when I officially hired my new Brand Strategist, Heather, at the start of 2015. And on 15th Feb, we made our first big business trip, to a big client meeting, in the big city of Melbourne, as a dream team duo. I’d booked us into the Westin, a brand I’ve grown rather fond of in recent years, for both work and play. And, as we checked in, we were informed that we’d each had an upgrade to a ‘Deluxe’ room. They had me at the word ‘Deluxe’! And deluxe, they certainly were. Really lovely rooms with sensational views across the city. I’m a member of the Starwood Preferred Guest Program (SPG) but there’s no specific level I have to achieve to keep me on my toes and presumably, my recent tendency to prefer the Westin in my hotel repertoire had paid dividends. Do I remember the other big brand hotels I like to stay at? Yep. The Shangri–La is in there, for a touch of decadence on a holiday/stopover, but the rest of the selection has paled somewhat in my recognition, for now.

3. Mini I bought my first Mini back in 2009. It was ‘pre loved’. (What a great example of how verbal identity can transform a somewhat ordinary concept into something you really want.) It was a convertible and I bought it in late October, back in England, and I distinctly remember driving home, top down, just because I could, with my friend Rachel freezing to death in the front passenger seat. I jumped into the car with my new set of keys and started reversing out of the parking space on the forecourt, when I noticed a huge bouquet of flowers on the back seat, just casually chilling out, with a lovely, handwritten ‘thank you’ card from the team involved. Now that’s what we like. FYI, my Mini dream was robbed from me somewhat early, when I got the offer to move to Sydney with Interbrand, so I went on to buy another pre loved model out here in Aus, at twice the price of the nearest equivalent in Europe. And there are those out there who say that branding doesn’t work… Those who nearly made it into the top three, but not quite, include: – The Ritz, London. For those of you who don’t know, The Ritz is an infamous, timeless, London establishment where you simply must go for afternoon tea, sweetie. They treated my Mum like the friggin’ Queen at her birthday tea and she was thrilled skinny (her phrase). Think: special ‘Happy Birthday’ solo by the resident harpist; personalised birthday cake (as if we needed any more food); and (tin foil) origami doggie bag in the shape of a swan (the neck doubled up as a carry handle). – Ocado (online shopping operated by Waitrose in the UK) and Coles (Australian supermarket) – both of whom slipped a bottle of crisp, chilled, white wine into one of my first online shopping deliveries, just because they knew I’d appreciate it. I most certainly did. – British Airways. Who upgraded me into a (much needed) Business flat bed on the red eye to London, one Monday morning, after a Hen Week Extravaganza in NYC. The guy called me up to the desk in the lounge, asked for my ticket, and ripped it up in my face – this was in the days before free Wifi and I thought he’d seem me ‘borrowing’ the phone line for my laptop, as I had an award paper to get out – but it was all just for dramatic effect, before he gave me my new Business class ticket. (They’ve now lost my favour though, after I slipped from Gold, right down to Blue, and they humiliated me for this fall from glory, ever since.)

Reading these branded examples back, it sounds like I have a pretty ritzy lifestyle. Only, on occasion, I assure you. 😉 So, onto my tips for improvement, as standard issue:

1. Dramatic and spontaneous – Don’t assume because you’re a more everyday retailer/brand like a supermarket, or toiletry store, that it isn’t as important for you to reward your customers as dramatically as it is for bigger ticket, more luxurious brands like airlines and hotels. We all have way too many better offers out there and we’re your bread and butter. – Employees need to be empowered to make spontaneous rewards on behalf of the brand they work for, to make the previous examples more common place for all of us. – A concept I talk to my clients about is ‘planned spontaneity’ – build in those pivotal surprise and delight moments into the customer journey, so that they become talked about hallmarks of your brand experience and spread oodles of free word of mouth endorsement.

2. Elephants never forget  – I’ve told everyone I know about the Emirates story above. But I’ve also bored people with the way that British Airways let me slip down into oblivion and feel pretty shit about it. I won’t travel with them again, or recommend them to my family and friends. Do you know how galling it is for someone who’s British, not to want to support our national airline?! Apparently, an unhappy customer will tell approx. 15 people about their bad experience. I’d say that’s an understatement these days. – Keep your database up to date and use it to keep tabs on how long your customers have been in your life, not just how much they spend and what they spend their cash on. So often, brands prioritise acquisition of shiny new customers, with ever more wonderful offers, and completely forget to recognise and reward their mid and old timers. – Notice when a customer defects, or simply slips off the radar, and ‘reach out’ to them, with anything from a phone call/survey that dishes the dirt, to a ‘we’ve missed you, please come back’ tail between your legs offer, that’s worth their while to consider.

3. Smooth and seamless – We now have the technology to recognise all of our customers, all of the time, regardless of which store/country/facet of our business they interact with. Put your hands in your pocket and implement this technology, to make our lives easier, so we spend more on you and feel good about doing so (without having to carry our loyalty card). Simples! – There’s no excuse for being passed around a call centre, or website, anymore, and having to re-identify yourself on each and every leg of that painful journey. Just. Sort. Your. Shit. Out. – Make rewards seamless versus putting the onus on the customer to opt in and/or activate their reward. We know you make more profit if we can’t all get around to claiming our prize by the timings you set, but, yup, that’s only going to make us think even less of you. Give us the voucher already and don’t set a stupid expiry date on it. Our loyalty can last forever if you play your cards right. Come to think of it, there are a few brands out there that I’ve given an awful lot of investment and loyalty to, during pretty significant milestones in my life, none of whom have given me a cent of recognition, or reward, by way of return. They don’t seem to know who they are, so here’s the naming and shaming: HSBC (House Purchase Number 1); CommBank (House Purchase Number 2); Apple (Business Number 1). You have been warned… 🙂 Until next time.